Course description

Every system has an architecture, whether accidental or intentional, and regardless of whether it was put in place by a nominated architect or whether it emerged from the decisions and discussions of a team. All too often the focus of what is often described as architecture is centred around a specific set of platform technologies, which forms only one part of the set of concerns an architecture should. And all too often architecture is seen as a separate concern from development process, whereas the two are intertwined — what you build is influenced by how you build it, and vice versa. This course looks at the relationship between Agile processes and good architecture, taking in development process models, architectural styles, requirements techniques, sufficient modelling techniques, design patterns and testing practices. This course includes a number of practical exercises so that attendees can see how the different activities fit together.

The course covers a wide range of topics through a number of practical exercises, with plenty of time dedicated to group discussion:

The relationship between development process and architecture

The roles and failure modes of testing, modelling and technology platforms

Different architectural styles and design patterns

How to transform product vision into architecture

Future-proofing your architecture, and accounting for uncertainty

How to ground your architecture and avoid overdesign

...and much more!

This course offers concrete practices that you can apply at work immediately.

Audience

Developers, architects, technical leads, delivery leads

Certification

You earn a certificate of participation by attending the course. No exam required.

Language

The course is taught in English.

Trainer

kevlinhenney Kevlin Henney
Consultant, Trainer, Writer, Author of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know

Kevlin is an independent consultant and trainer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and web sites, including Better Software, The Register, Application Development Advisor, Java Report and the C/C++ Users Journal. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of the 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know site and book.

Regular

 

300€

Early Combo (with DevTernity 2017 ticket)

valid until 01.09.2017

450€

Combo (with DevTernity 2017 ticket)

valid until 15.11.2017

500€

* Price does not include VAT (if applicable)

* Price for in-house training does not include travelling and accommodation costs (if training is hosted outside of Riga)

* This training is a subject to training cancellationpolicy